My Favorite Things of 2014, Part 1: Comics

Here we are again, another year of comics, movies, and music to inspire!  As in Years Past, I like to compile a list of some of the art that I enjoyed throughout the year.  It’s a good reminder for me to remember what inspires me, but also a chance to share great stuff with others.  I found that this year’s list got pretty big, so I am dividing it up into 3 parts: Comics, Movies, & Music.  Also note, I try not to recycle stuff from previous years, as those lists are still out there to see.  Even though many of those things are still awesome (like Space-Mullet & Prophet).  Now, of course, I’m going to start with Comics!

COMICS

The Wrenchies, by Farel Dalrymple

wrenchies

This is a what comics are all about.  Farel operates on a different plane with The Wrenchies. The dreamlike storytelling is punctuated by stand-out moments of sadness and introspection.  The inked/watercolored art is absolutely gorgeous.  I was lucky to catch an exhibition of original pages from the book and was dumb-founded by how good they looked in person.  There is no digital trickery here, Farel’s just THAT GOOD.  Shea Hennum over at This Is Infamous wrote a great article about Wrenchies that will do the book more justice than I can, so check that out.  If Wrenchies doesn’t sweep the Ignatz and Eisner awards, I might lose all faith in comics. GET THE WRENCHIES

Death of a Crow, by Liam Cobb

liam

Pay attention folks.  Liam is one to watch.  He posted Death of a Crow on His Tumblr and it spread across the net like wildfire.  And it’s easy to see why.  Wonderfully illustrated and full of symbolism and pathos, it’s a great example of the power of comics.  The reader is drawn in and led to think and draw conclusions about the world presented.  Liam has done quite a few striking short comics on his tumblr so go dig in.

Ritual #3: Vile Decay, by Malachi Ward

malachi

Malachi must be Rod Serling re-incarnated.  His scifi/fantasy/speculative fiction has been an invigorating addition to the comics scene for a few years now.  Vile Decay really hits on all cylinders.  Malachi’s illustrations are detailed, while still maintaining a cartooned iconic feel.  Vile Decay explores character relationships through surreal landscapes and violent riots.  The limited color palette and spot-on paper decisions all add up to a book with a unique feeling that enhances the themes within.  GET VILE DECAY

Half Asleep #2-3, by Beth Hetland & Kyle O’Connell

halfasleep

Beth & Kyle turned comics up to 11 a couple years ago with Cycles, which I loved.  Initially, Half Asleep was a hard swallow for me.  But as the series has progressed, they have really found their voice.  O’Connell’s manic concepts spew forth while Hetland uses the tricks of the comics trade to deftly translate the unreal to real.  Characters are expertly developed through their actions rather than drawn out dialogue.  On top of that, each book sports artful screen-printed hand-cut covers.  I’m really excited to see where these two go with Half Asleep next year. GET HALF ASLEEP

Pax Americana, by Frank Quitely & Grant Morrison

pax

Frank Quitely is an illustration god.  He pushes the limits of the medium with each new book, without alienating mainstream sensibilities.  I barely have an understanding of what’s happening in this beautiful book, but I will enjoy digging into it and deciphering the puzzle for months to come.

In the Sounds & Seas: Volume 2, by Marnie Galloway

marnie

It was a long time coming, but SO worth the wait.  Marnie’s work has progressed wonderfully since volume 1.  Her illustration style lends itself to the story’s themes of interconnectedness and myth.  She has also grown as a panel to panel storyteller, finding clarity in the small moments portrayed, while still including beautiful stylistic flourishes in each drawing.  In the Sounds & Seas it not like anything else out right now and it showcases a unique voice in the medium. GET IN THE SOUNDS & SEAS

Gardens of Glass, by Lando

lando

Lando is another example of a creator with a strong voice.  Gardens of Glass is a collection of the stories Lando has published through the always trippy scifi collective anthology Decadence Comics.  Seeing the stories side by side, you find that Lando has been building not only a style, but almost a complete world-view.  Each piece compliments the next, re-inforcing ideas and visual queues.  The drawings themselves are beautiful and delicate as well, with clear influences from manga and french comics .  Gardens of Glass was published by Breakdown Press, who are also doing super cool stuff with comics. GET GARDENS OF GLASS

Time Capsule #2, Peow Studios

peow

Much like Breakdown & Decadence Comics, Peow is working with immensely talented artists in creating beautiful book objects.  Time Capsule is one of the best looking Risograph printed comics I’ve come across to date.  The Riso has quickly become a mainstay in indy comics, but no one has quite harnessed the potential of the press like Peow.  Featured in this issue are Stathis Tsemberlidis (of Decadence Comics), Wren Mcdonald, and Matt Sheean (regular collaborator with Malachi Ward & Prophet alumni).  Stathis and Matt’s pieces stand out to me the most, as they both have less focus on traditional narrative.  Stathis shows a figure as it accelerates through time and space, (literally) smashing through touchpoints of human existence.  Matt gives us a strange story featuring children in the woods of a new planet.  Matt has a way of presenting visual and text information that is almost rhythmic and inseparable from eachother. Love it. GET TIME CAPSULE

Prophet: Strikefile #1-2, Brandon Graham, Simon Roy, & The Prophet All Stars

prophetstrike

Ok it should be obvious from all my other picks, as well as previous year’s picks, that I’m going to be ALL ABOUT Prophet Strikefile.  As with the series itself, Brandon & friends have taken a concept (the sourcebook comic) and elevated it to something a little smarter, a little prettier, and a lot awesome-r.

Honorable Mention:

 Ghost Fleet, Don Cates & Daniel Warren Johnson

gf

Don’t get me wrong, Ghost Fleet is amazing.  I just have a feeling it’s really going to shine next year.  Daniel is an artist on his way up I’m privy to what he’s cooking up in future issues of Ghost Fleet.  And Donny’s story is pretty bananas.  You need to jump on board now, because Ghost Fleet will blow your mind in 2015.

I’m positive I’ve missed some great books this year.  Please let me know what you think I should check out from 2014!  I’ll be back soon with Part 2, discussing my favorite movies of the year.

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3 Comments on “My Favorite Things of 2014, Part 1: Comics”

  1. […] My Favorite Things of 2014, Part 1: Comics → […]

  2. […] finally we have my picks for favorite music this year.  You can see my picks for comics and movies in the links you just […]

  3. […] current year. So, if you’re curious about my favorite things from past years, you can look at 2014 here, 2013 here, and 2012 […]


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